Taking a grinder to Britain's motorcycling heritage.
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BRITISH CLASS

BRITISH CLASS
MONTGOMERY-ANZANI

Saturday, 29 January 2011

A Little Bit More Grief

When I sent the rods up to SRM to have the big end eyes honed I mentioned in the note that I want the little end bushes checked, and replaced and honed if necessary. I got an e-mail back asking to send the gudgeon (wrist) pins up for measurement purposes if new ones needed to be fitted. Got them out and ready to send, it was then it was realised that one of them was corroded, what was thought to be shit turned out to be a corroded line. No probs phone up SRM and say carry on with two new pins, er no! Long Stroke A7 pins, ain't got any, can't get any. A few phone calls to other suppliers didn't turn anything up either, although Mark at C&D Autos said he was going to check his Hepolite catalogues over the weekend to see if he can cross reference the dimensions.
The dimensions are 2 inches long and 11/16" Diameter, don't know if anything like 500 Triumph might fit.


Still it's not a show stopper, there are some somewhere.
The old rocker boxes were stripped of the rockers, spindles and studs and these were transferred to the NOS boxes bought some time ago. Not much of a step forward but a step never the less.


Smiffy was spraying some of his Vincent parts with some kind of heat proof 2 pack, managed to slip the barrels in whilst he was at it. Very shiny and it lasts on his Vin so all should be good.

Stripped the gearbox out ready for blasting and polishing. The condition of the gears and shafts in the main case do not seem to match that of the gear change mechanism. There is very little, if any wear to the gears or shafts and everything wiped clean and pretty much looked new in there. To such an extent that it may have been fully rebuilt very shortly before coming off the road. The gear change mechanism is partly missing and the outer cases look to have had a hard life, completely at odds with the rest of it. It is very possible that at some time the kick start/gear change end has been swapped with another to keep a bike on the road leaving the main section un touched.

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